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A Level

Active Learning at A Level: Banham & Hall

‘I forget what I was taught, I only remember what I’ve learnt.’ Dale Banham (Northgate High School, Ipswich) Russell Hall (Kesgrave High School, Ipswich) This article provides a brief synopsis of an action research project between two schools in Ipswich. Our aims have been to promote curiosity, intrinsic motivation and a greater degree of independence amongst our A Level students. We recently shar...

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Timelines, Time-Stories and Developing Confidence at A level

Using the example of the Wars of the Roses,Ian Dawson discusses the use of timelines and time-stories to develop an overview of the content of a new module. He argues that an overview is vital because it creates confidence, it creates a context and it starts to give a module a unity. See this discussion on Ian’s free website.

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Using life histories deepens students’ thinking

This activity, by Diana Laffin, forms part of a sequence of learning focussed on the enquiry question: Did the Fascists unite or divide Italy in the years 1922-1944? It uses real life narratives to develop students’ thinking about the impact of fascism on the lives of individual Italians during this period. The activity requires small groups of students to work collaboratively on an individual lif...

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Students As Movie Makers

Richard Kennett (at Redland Green School, Bristol) writes … When I was a child ‘visual history’, on the whole, meant Ladybird books with their combination of text and illustrations, but in the words of Bob Dylan “the times they are a changing”. With video sharing sites like YouTube, students today have instant access to a vast array of audio-visual historical resources. Now is the time to take adv...

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Who were the Girondins?

Unlike a club that people joined, such as the Jacobin Club, the Girondins were never quite so clearly identifiable as a group and historians have debated whether they actually existed as a political party or whether they were linked by ties of friendship and geography. Many of the Girondins came from the Gironde region (e.g. Bergeoing, Ducos, Gensonné, Guadet, and Vergniaud) and some of them were ...

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